Rob’s Album Of The Week: Lettuce’s Resonate

Rob Duguay
3 min readMay 13, 2020

The feeling of positivity that comes from funk music is hard to explain. Where does it come from? The dynamic rhythms? The bombastic horns? The cool bass lines? It might come from all of these but it can’t be disputed once you have a bunch of people groovin’ to the tunes. Maybe some funk is what we all need these days to help us deal with this current calamity we’re all in. Thankfully, Boston funk masters Lettuce released their seventh album, Resonate, via Round Hill Records on May 8. It’s brings an excellent sound with numerous build-ups and transitions while letting the energy flow at a steady pace.

What separates Lettuce from a lot of their contemporaries is how they’re willing to include different things into their sound. Psychedelia, electronica and hip hop are definitely noticeable along with the horns from saxophonist Ryan Zoidis and Eric “Benny” Bloom” on the trumpet. Nigel Hall’s skills on the keys are the sonic ganache while bassist Erick “Jesus” Coomes and drummer Adam Dietch create the rhythmic cake. An understated part of the band’s music in the record is guitarist Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff’s riffs. There are some progressive rock and jazz influences that stand out without being too overbearing on the ears.

While the COVID-19 outbreak puts more people in the hospital daily, the rest of us who are staying safe and healthy find ourselves becoming drained in numerous ways. We’re emotionally drained due to the uncertainty and the misinformation that surrounds us along with the loss of loved ones. We’re physically drained because of sheer boredom and the mental stress we’re dealing with as we try to make it through each day. Our bank accounts are most likely being drained due to being out of work and the unemployment system being ridiculously unreliable. It’s a lot to face, but hopefully my top tracks off of the Album Of The Week can detach us from reality for a short while:

Being joined by Big Tony Fisher and Tyrone “Jungle Boogie” Williams from the Washington, D.C. Go-Go acts Trouble Funk and Rare Essence, “Checker Wrecker” incorporates the hip hop element mentioned earlier. Rather than a barrage of rhymes, Fisher acts like an MC who is toasting and conducting in his own unique way. “Moksha” is the most interesting song on the album due to sitarist Indrajit Banerjee being involved, it’s an…

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Rob Duguay

Editor-In-Chief & Founder of Culture Beat on Medium. Freelance Arts & Entertainment Journalist based in Providence, RI. Email: rob.c.duguay@gmail.com